Family Teddy

by Laura Smith
(swindon)

Hello. Just wondering if you can help me. I am in the possession of very old teddy bear which i believe could be a steiff. To give you some background and history of this teddy. My mum is 85 years old and was born in 1933 . and unfortunately she lost her mother during child birth when she was only 4 years old. During this period a lady spotted her crying when her mother passed away, and consoled her . My mother told me that whilst this lady was speaking to her she disappeared and then came back to hand her this old teddy bear. Telling her that he would look after her for the rest of her life. My mother kept this teddy by the side of her bed for the last 81 years. My mum informed me that the teddy was very old when it was given to her at the time, as no one had new toys during this period. From the moment my mum introduced me to our teddy i have always found him fascinating, yes over the years he has grown old along side my mother and i would say he has aged with dignity. To give you some description about our teddy.

He is golden brown in color and short hair. The fur seems very hard . When you squeeze his arm you can slightly hear crunching noise which suggests he could be stuff with straw. He has a hard stitched black nose, which looks like stitching, which is joined to his mouth.He has a elongated snout . His eyes look glass eyes with a amber ring and black pupil, And slightly moving head. His ears are small and tatty and looking at him his left ear looks slightly torn. His body is hard and he has a hump on the back towards his neck. His arms and legs are very movable (Go up and down) and stitching to both paws with material pad for the inner palms. He has the same material on the pads of his feet. His length approx 8 to 9 inches stretched. He also has stitching to his toes. When legs are folded up he sits up all on his own. Noticeable he doesn't weigh a lot and seems very light.

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